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Understanding Assignments  

Last Updated: Apr 3, 2012 URL: http://libguides.walsh.edu/assignments Print Guide RSS Updates

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Objective

The first step in any successful college writing venture is reading the assignment. While this sounds like a simple task, it can be a tough one.

This guide will help you unravel your assignment and begin to craft an effective response. Much of the following advice will involve translating typical assignment terms and practices into meaningful clues to the type of writing your instructor expects.

 

Beginning

Consider adopting two habits that will serve you well—regardless of the assignment, department, or instructor:

  1. Read the assignment carefully as soon as you receive it. Do not put this task off—reading the assignment at the beginning will save you time, stress, and problems later. An assignment can look pretty straightforward at first, particularly if the instructor has provided lots of information. That does not mean it will not take time and effort to complete; you may even have to learn a new skill to complete the assignment.

  2. Ask the instructor about anything you do not understand. Do not hesitate to approach your instructor. Instructors would prefer to set you straight before you hand the paper in. That's also when you will find their feedback most useful.
 

Breakdown of Assignments

Assignment formats

Many assignments follow a basic format. Assignments often begin with an overview of the topic, include a central verb or verbs that describe the task, and offer some additional suggestions, questions, or prompts to get you started:

1. An overview of some kind

The instructor might set the stage with some general discussion of the subject of the assignment, introduce the topic, or remind you of something pertinent that you have discussed in class. For example:

"Throughout history, gerbils have played a key role in politics" or "In the last few weeks of class, we have focused on the evening wear of the housefly ..."

2. The task of the assignment

Pay attention; this part tells you what to do when you write the paper. Look for the key verb or verbs in the sentence. Words like analyze, summarize, or compare direct you to think about your topic in a certain way. Also pay attention to words such as how, what, when, where, and why; these words specify tasks. (See the section in this handout titled "Key Terms" for more information.)

"Analyze the effect that gerbils had on the Russian Revolution," or "Suggest an interpretation of housefly undergarments that differs from Darwin's."

3. Additional material to think about

Here you will find some questions to use as springboards as you begin to think about the topic. Instructors usually include these questions as suggestions rather than requirements. Do not feel compelled to answer every question unless the instructor asks you to do so. Pay attention to the order of the questions. Sometimes they suggest the thinking process your instructor imagines you will need to follow to begin thinking about the topic.

"You may wish to consider the differing views held by Communist gerbils vs. Monarchist gerbils," or "Can there be such a thing as ‘the housefly garment industry' or is it just a home-based craft?"

4. Style tips

These are the instructor's comments about writing expectations:

"Be concise," "Write effectively," or "Argue furiously."

5. Technical details

These instructions usually indicate format rules or guidelines.

"Your paper must be typed in Palatino font on gray paper and must not exceed 600 pages. It is due on the anniversary of Mao Tse-tung's death."

The assignment's parts may not appear in exactly this order, and each part may be very long or really short. Nonetheless, being aware of this standard pattern can help you understand what your instructor wants you to do.

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